Three Ways To Gracefully End A Facebook Friendship

According to Lisa Larter ….It happens to people all the time. You go to someone’s profile on Facebook and realize, “whoops” you are no longer friends!

Discovering that someone has “un-friended” you can bring back a whole slew of high school emotions and make you feel slighted by that individual.

It happens every day though. You look at your Facebook news feed and some of the same people show up over and over and over again and one day you just feel like you have had enough and, the only thing you know to do is remove them as your friend.

For a business owner, that is not good. Imagine your client telling someone the story about you and your maturity level and how you “un-friended” them on Facebook for no good reason! I am guessing that is NOT the kind of word of mouth marketing you were hoping to achieve.

Read the entire blog

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

Affect Versus Effect

When Should You Use Affect? We checked out an expert ….. Grammar girl

Affect with an a means “to influence,” as in, “The arrows affected Ardvark,” or “The rain affected Amy’s hairdo.” Affect can also mean, roughly, “to act in a way that you don’t feel,” as in, “She affected an air of superiority.”

When Should You Use Effect?

Effect with an e has a lot of subtle meanings as a noun, but to me the meaning “a result” seems to be at the core of all the definitions. For example, you can say, “The effect was eye-popping,” or “The sound effects were amazing,” or “The rain had no effect on Amy’s hairdo.”

 

Learn more ….

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/affect-versus-effect.aspx

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

What To Do If Your Email Is Hacked

 

Don’t we hate that email that goes out to friends telling them while on a sudden trip to Europe you were robbed and oh by the way, send money! Thanks to www.switched.com here is the “Treatment”

Depending on the kind of hack you’ve been dealt, the treatment may be as simple as logging in, and changing your settings and password. Or it may entail agonizingly repeated attempts to lock out a persistent hacker, potentially killing off your account altogether. But you should never just give up and ditch the account without trying to deal with it first.

If you aren’t able to log in, you’re likely going to have to go through some frustrating hoop jumping. Conveniently, Twitter’s help page has a handy list of links for all the major e-mail services’ support pages.

Each service has its own method for determining that you are who you say you are, and are not the person who hacked — or is planning to hack — your account. Besides pre-set security questions, they may ask specific details about messages you’ve sent, and even the exact day you set up the account. If you don’t have a copy of your initial registration e-mail, try contacting a close friend whom you would have e-mailed at the time, and ask them to dig into their archives for your early missives.

If you can log in:

  1. Make sure your PC is current with OS updates and anti-virus/malware software. Otherwise, if it has been infected by malware that spies on you, it will continue to transmit your info to whichever hacker has infiltrated your accounts. If you aren’t completely sure your PC is clean, then don’t do any of the following. Any changes you attempt to make could be forwarded on by malware, too.
  2. Depending on how your account has been abused, you may not need to contact everyone spammed by your hacked e-mail. (Your scam-savvy friends will recognize bogus messages as spam.) But, if there is a personal appeal for money — saying you’re stuck traveling and need cash, or are hurt and in a hospital — or if malware was attached, you should send word to your contact list to delete those messages ASAP.
  3. Set up at least two new e-mail addresses. Use your original e-mail address for personal or business communication as you’d normally do. The secondary e-mail address is insurance against future hacks; use it to communicate with your service provider, since many now ask for an alternative address as added protection. Then, use a third e-mail address only for registering for sites, newsletters, online shopping and other services. It may seem paranoid and excessive (hey, that’s us!), but the idea is to compartmentalize your online life a bit. That way, each “world” has its own discrete e-mail account, and will minimize the damage that can be done by any future hacks. Most importantly, though: use a different and strong password for each account — one that is at least six characters long, and is a combination of letters, numbers and capitals/lowercase. It sounds difficult, but it isn’t. It’ll help prevent any hacker from gaining access to all of your data simply by infiltrating one site.
  4. On a secure PC, log into your e-mail and then check whether or not any of the settings have been changed by a hacker. Smart hackers may set your account to notify them of any changes, so that they can go back in and switch things again. Check whether or not a signature has been added, and whether your account has been set to forward e-mail to another address that isn’t yours or to run a filter that automatically forwards e-mails or attaches a file. If any of those settings have been altered, delete the new settings.
  5. Once you have changed the settings, create a new password, and add your secondary e-mail account as your alternative address.
  6. Going forward, never list your main e-mail address publicly anywhere online — in forums, in online ads, on blogs or any place where they can be harvested by spammers. Use only your “registration” address, and keep it separate from your main address book.
  7. Don’t use public computers to check e-mail; there’s virtually no way to know if they are infected with malware accidentally, or have keylogging spyware installed intentionally. But if you absolutely must use e-mail on a public computer, set up an extra account before you leave and change the password regularly.

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

5 Healthy Resolutions for Women

Happy New Year Good Gossipers!

As we begin a new year, many people set resolutions. Have you? Are you sticking to them?

According to WebMD, the path to good health is not an easy one for women–that women tend to face more roadblocks along the way. Read what experts share about their thoughts on the top 5 things women can do to get healthy and well in the new year here.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

Time to set goals!

As we near the end of another year, it’s fun to set goals for the New Year. It’s important to set goals because it focuses you. Set clearly defined goals, ones that measurable and attainable. For example, saying “I want to lose some weight” is not a clearly defined goal because it does not put a measure in place. A more clearly defined weight-loss goal might be “I want to lose 20 pounds by March 1st.”

Once you get in the habit of setting some short-range goals, it’s fun to start setting some bigger, loftier goals for your career, education, physical, family, financial…the list goes on! Spend some time journaling and reflecting on what you want–get really specific and then start creating smaller goals on the path to achieving the bigger goals.

Make sure that your goals are S-M-A-R-T:

Specific

Measurable

Attainable

Relevant

Time (having a time associated with it)

Share with us your goals so we can help cheer you on!

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

Holiday Weight Loss Tips

Avoid Holiday Weight Gain Good Housekeeping has a great article for surviving the holidays without sacrificing your weight loss goals. One of the biggest tips is to make sure to plan. Some other tips include realizing the challenge, write down your goals, have a buddy, and identify difficult situations.  Read more here.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

Gossip may be good for you!

People gossipingAccording to an article on msnbc.com, gossip may actually be good for you. Researchers say that a bit of gossip is healthy. It’s what keeps culture going and greases the social machinery. Check out the scoop here.  Let us know what you think…

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

Got Meditation?

Bliss.com provides some great tips for mediation for women on the go…read more here. The five steps to mediation on the go includes: 1. tune in–have some essential CDs with you to help bring calm; 2. choose your mantras wisely–your life is complex, meditation doesn’t have to be; 3. make a date with yourself–plan to meditate 5-10 minutes a day; 4. Drive yourself sane–do you spend a lot of time commuting? This can be a great time to practice tranquility; and 5. Do mealtime mini-meditations–since eating is already planned in each day, take a few moments to pause appreciate your meal.

Meditation made easy!

Got ideas? Share them with us!

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

The Busy Woman’s Guide to Health and Fitness

HealthyLiving.com has a lot of great resources for busy women. Topics on the site include eating better now, exercise 101, fitness in a hurry (they have an article on burning 300 calories in 30 minutes!) and various weight loss tips and daily health info. Check it out and let us know what you think!

http://healthyliving.about.com/

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter

The Ultimate Guide to Cooking a Thanksgiving Turkey

cooking a turkeyIn honor of the Thanksgiving this week, we decided to look for some handy resources on cooking that turkey! Check out startcooking.com for the ultimate guide to cooking the centerpiece of your Thanksgiving dinner.  This blog post is very thorough and covers 10 questions about how to buy a turkey, what to do with leftovers and more!

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Kirtsy
  • StumbleUpon
  • Technorati
  • Twitter